IHR Seminar Programme for Autumn 2016

We're delighted to be able to announce our seminar topics and speakers for the autumn term. We hope you're able to join us. October 12 The Unpalatable Past (1) Senate House – Pollard Seminar Room N301 The Rhodes Must Fall Campaign and the Cultural Politics of the British Imperial Past Bill Schwarz (Queen Mary, UL) … Continue reading IHR Seminar Programme for Autumn 2016

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Seminar Event: The Rhodes Must Fall Campaign and the Cultural Politics of the British Imperial Past

Prof Saul Dubow (Queen Mary, UL) & Prof Bill Schwarz (Queen Mary, UL) Chair: Prof John Tosh (Roehampton) Wednesday 12 October, 5.30 pm Pollard Seminar Room (N301) Senate House Within just weeks of its initiation by students at the University of Cape Town in March 2015, the Rhodes Must Fall campaign led to the removal … Continue reading Seminar Event: The Rhodes Must Fall Campaign and the Cultural Politics of the British Imperial Past

Connecting History, Policy and the Public

Connecting History, Policy and the Public: Symposium and Book Launch An IHR Public History Seminar and London Centre for Public History event convened by Alix Green and Edward Madigan. Friday 24th June, Senate House Room 349, University of London, Malet Street, London. Symposium: 2-6pm Launch of History, Policy and Public Purpose, by Alix Green: 6-8pm Confirmed … Continue reading Connecting History, Policy and the Public

Seminar: Jerome de Groot on the use of DNA in Popular Genealogy

Join us next Wednesday 16th March at 5:30 pm in IHR 202 for the next IHR Public History Seminar. We are delighted that Jerome de Groot will be joining us to discuss DNA in popular genealogy. Details below. Double Helix History: the use of DNA in Popular Genealogy? Dr Jerome de Groot (University of Manchester) Genealogy … Continue reading Seminar: Jerome de Groot on the use of DNA in Popular Genealogy

Seminar Event: The personal heritage research environment in the 21st century

Join us for our first seminar of 2016. All welcome, no need to book. The personal heritage research environment in the 21st century Dr Nick Barratt (Author, historian and consultant for BBC 'Who Do You think You Are?') Date: 3 February Time: 17:30 Venue: Past & Present Room 202, 2nd floor, IHR, North block, Senate … Continue reading Seminar Event: The personal heritage research environment in the 21st century

Seminar Event: The Generational Transmission of Memory and Identity through ‘Family Heritage’

The Generational Transmission of Memory and Identity through 'Family Heritage' Anne-Marie Kramer (University of Nottingham) Date: 2 December 2015 Time: 17:30 Venue:  Past & Present Room 202, 2nd floor, IHR, North block, Senate House This paper will explore the generational transmission of memory and identity through a focus on the role of ‘family heritage’. It will analyse what … Continue reading Seminar Event: The Generational Transmission of Memory and Identity through ‘Family Heritage’

Seminar Event: Homesick for Yesterday: A history of the “nostalgia wave” in the 1970s and 80s

Homesick for Yesterday: A history of the "nostalgia wave" in the 1970s and 80s Tobias Becker (German Historical Institute, London) Date: 4 November 2015 Time: Wednesday, 17:30 Venue:  Past & Present Room 202, 2nd floor, IHR, North block, Senate House All throughout the 1970s and 80s intellectuals in the United States, Britain and West Germany … Continue reading Seminar Event: Homesick for Yesterday: A history of the “nostalgia wave” in the 1970s and 80s

Histories of Public Histories: Migrants and Refugees

Eureka Henrich (University of Leicester Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship in Medical Humanities) has blogged some thoughts on the ‘What is Public History in the light of the recent refugee crisis?’ seminar, 21/10/2015.

Eureka Henrich

My brain is still happily buzzing from last night’s IHR Public History Seminar on the question, ‘What is public history in light of the refugee crisis?’ (a intro to the event from Kathleen McIlvenna can be found here). With thoughtful and engaging responses from the different perspectives of academia (Prof Peter Gatrell, Manchester and Prof David Feldman, Birkbeck), museums (Susie Symes, 19 Princelet Street), and humanitarian organisations (Juliano Fiori, Save the Children), the roundtable raised common problems and tensions in the representation of refugee pasts and presents.

The dangers of conflating the current ‘refugee crisis’ with past crises (and perhaps even adopting that language) was a major theme – one that has been pulled apart skilfully in recent months by Jessica Reinisch. Another was the tendency in ‘pro-refugee’ discourses to emphasise refugee contributions to society (think of the UNHCR ‘Einstein was a refugee’ poster shared widely online) as justification…

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The Role of Public History in the History of Refugees and Migrants

Over the summer the media was full of images and news stories on what was being called the ‘worst refugee crisis’ in Europe since the Second World War. Such a label inevitably brings historical comparisons and many reports attempted to underline the scale of the migration into Europe from the Middle East and Africa with … Continue reading The Role of Public History in the History of Refugees and Migrants